Category Archives: 075 Police

Sandra Bland’s Arrest Wasn’t Racism; It Was Something Even Worse

“Ultimately, we have to look at what we are asking police officers to do and how we are training them to do it. Encinia may have treated Bland differently because she was black. We can’t read his mind. But it’s much more likely he treated her the way he did because she didn’t exhibit blind obedience to his every whim, something he was trained not to tolerate and Americans of all political persuasions seem to have acquiesced to without question.”

(Via.) Tom Mullen

An Open Letter To Baltimore & The World: How To End Police Brutality Forever

“Question: How long has police brutality been around?

Answer: Ever since there was police.

Sure, some places its better and some places it is worse.

But, have you ever noticed when you have a problem and you keep trying to fix it and it never works… then, what you realize, was that you had the wrong concept? As a simple example, when you try to remove the lid off a jar of pickels and you try and try but just can’t? Then, finally, you realize you were trying to turn it the wrong way! Once you understood how it worked, the solution was easy.

It’s the same with the police brutality question. You keep trying to fix it and fix it but never can. Why? Because you’ve got the wrong concept.”

(Via.) TDVA <—Read more here

The FBI faked an entire field of forensic science – Pseudoscience in the Witness Box

“The Washington Post published a story so horrifying this weekend that it would stop your breath: ‘The Justice Department and FBI have formally acknowledged that nearly every examiner in an elite FBI forensic unit gave flawed testimony in almost all trials in which they offered evidence against criminal defendants over more than a two-decade period before 2000.’

What went wrong? The Post continues: ‘Of 28 examiners with the FBI Laboratory’s microscopic hair comparison unit, 26 overstated forensic matches in ways that favored prosecutors in more than 95 percent of the 268 trials reviewed so far.’ The shameful, horrifying errors were uncovered in a massive, three-year review by the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and the Innocence Project. Following revelations published in recent years, the two groups are helping the government with the country’s largest ever post-conviction review of questioned forensic evidence.

Chillingly, as the Post continues, ‘the cases include those of 32 defendants sentenced to death.’ Of these defendants, 14 have already been executed or died in prison.

The massive review raises questions about the veracity of not just expert hair testimony, but also the bite-mark and other forensic testimony offered as objective, scientific evidence to jurors who, not unreasonably, believed that scientists in white coats knew what they were talking about. As Peter Neufeld, co-founder of the Innocence Project, put it, ‘The FBI’s three-decade use of microscopic hair analysis to incriminate defendants was a complete disaster.’”

(Via.)  Jurisprudence <—Read more here

New York Deputy Slaps Citizen for Not Allowing him to Search Car

“In a Facebook message interview with Photography is Not a Crime, Roberts explained that he and his buddy, Colin Fitch, who owns the car, had parked it at a business that was closed and walked to a nearby party Thursday night. They didn’t spend much time at the party but when they walked back to the car, they were confronted by deputies who had spotted a rifle in the back seat and wanted to search the car.

Fitch had purchased a .22 rifle earlier that day and had left in the back seat, Roberts said.

When Deputy Glans asked to search the car, Fitch would not give him permission, insisting he had done nothing illegal.

‘We’ll get a fucking search warrant, alright,’ Glans said. ‘Wanna do that?’’Let me see your fucking keys,’ Glans said.

‘Why?’ Fitch responded.

‘I’m going to search your fucking car, that’s why,’ Glans replied.

‘You can’t do that,’ Fitch said.

‘Wanna fucking resist?,’ Glans said before striking him.

‘If you have nothing to hide in there, we’re just going to check and be on our fucking merry way. Understand? Asshole.’”

 

(Via.) PINAC

Woman Had to Film Herself Being Raped By a Probation Officer so Police Would Believe Her Story

“Coral Springs, FL — A man whose job was to help guide people after they’ve been released from prison, has been arrested himself, after being accused of vile criminal acts.

A parole officer in South Florida was arrested this week for sexually assaulting a woman on probation. The woman was so scared of violating her probation if she turned him in, that she had to film their second encounter in order to prove this cop’s misdeeds.

According to police, 50-year-old Zachary Thomas Bailey used his authority to target the victim, telling her he needed to do a ‘study’ of her home in Coral Springs.

‘This is someone who is hired to protect you,’ said Coral Springs Police Lt. Joe McCue, ‘hired to say, ‘Hey, protect the society,’ and you don’t expect your probation officer to be acting in this manner.’”

(Via.) Liberty Crier

Federal Agents Investigating Bitcoin Money Laundering Extorted, Stole Over $1 Million In Bitcoin

“This is one of those sad times when The Onion realizes it has badly, and permanently, missed its IPO window.

Just released from the Department of Justice

Former Federal Agents Charged With Bitcoin Money Laundering and Wire Fraud

Agents Were Part of Baltimore’s Silk Road Task Force

Two former federal agents have been charged with wire fraud, money laundering and related offenses for stealing digital currency during their investigation of the Silk Road, an underground black market that allowed users to conduct illegal transactions over the Internet. The charges are contained in a federal criminal complaint issued on March 25, 2015, in the Northern District of California and unsealed today.

Assistant Attorney General Leslie R. Caldwell of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney Melinda Haag of the Northern District of California, Special Agent in Charge David J. Johnson of the FBI’s San Francisco Division, Special Agent in Charge José M. Martinez of the Internal Revenue Service-Criminal Investigation’s (IRS-CI) San Francisco Division, Special Agent in Charge Michael P. Tompkins of the Justice Department’s Office of the Inspector General Washington Field Office and Special Agent in Charge Lori Hazenstab of the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of the Inspector General in Washington D.C. made the announcement.”

(Via.) Zero Hedge

Underdogs and Overlords

A little less than a year ago, Michael Vickers shot and seriously wounded a 10-year-old boy in Broxton, Georgia under circumstances that remain unclear. The victim, Dakota Corbitt, suffered serious and potentially permanent injury to his leg.

Despite the fact that this was an act of firearms-related violence involving a child, no charges were filed against Vickers. Although the public record is barren of a comment from Coffee County Sheriff Doyle Wooten expressing sympathy for Dakota and his mother, Amy, the sheriff pointedly commiserated with the shooter, telling a local NBC affiliate that Vickers is the father of three young children and that the shooting ‘is really preying on his mind.

Many people bearing such burdens would make a point of meeting with the injured child and expressing contrition in person. Vickers didn’t have time for such a gesture, however, because immediately after the shooting he went on what was described as a “pre-approved vacation” from his job…’”

(Via.) Pro Libertate

Texas Town Experiences 61% Drop in Crime After Firing Their Police Department | The Free Thought Project

Another aspect, and possibly the most important, that sets privatized police apart from agents of the state, is that they have a negative incentive to initiate force. Force and violence are vastly more expensive than today’s police lead us to believe.

Causing injury or death, or wrongfully depriving someone of their rights is very expensive if these costs are realized for the ones who cause them. The state does not care, however. They can and will defer their liability to the tax farm.

The act of deferment of liability is a function solely reserved for the state, and it creates an incentive to act in an unethical manner. In the case of SEAL Security, each of their officers, as well as their entire operation, can be held liable, both criminally and financially. This is something about which the state knows nothing.

As guns.com points out, over 70 communities in Harris County and most of the major management districts have contracted with SEAL. They’re less expensive, better at crime prevention, they do not target citizens for revenue, and, best of all, each officer is personally accountable for his or her actions.

It’s time Americans start seriously considering this option.

Law enforcement is a product that we are forced to buy. When any product is not subject to the forces of consumer demand, there is no way of changing it. It is time we applied the fundamental lesson of competition to our supposed protectors.

via The Free Thought Project

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