Category Archives: 061 Distributed Security

The Gun Control Campaign Against The AR-15 Is Full Of Lies

“Moreover, the nice thing about having our individual rights codified in the Constitution is that Americans, unlike most others, don’t (or shouldn’t) have to explain ourselves to government officials. Though many Americans use ARs to hunt, I’m certain nothing in the Second Amendment (or the debates surrounding the Constitution) mention “hunting,” because the right to self-defense—both as an individual concern and a buttress against tyranny—had nothing to do with bagging deer. It was about the state taking away firearms.”

 

 

Political efforts to ban the AR-15 are part of an incremental movement by gun controllers to ban all semi-automatic guns.

Source: The Gun Control Campaign Against The AR-15 Is Full Of Lies

Less than 24 hours after mass shooting at mosques, New Zealand vows to ban semi-automatic rifles. Idiocracy at its best.

Less than 24 hours after mass shooting at mosques, New Zealand vows to ban semi-automatic rifles

This is idiotic. And counterproductive. Instead, Jacinda Ardern should pass an emergency declaration authorizing funding to subsidize the cost of semi-automatic rifles and training for all houses of worship in New Zealand.

Why?

Because her ban won’t stop the next attack.

Because profiling won’t identify the next risk.

Because cops won’t be there in time.

Because worshipers are the best defenders of their place of worship.

Because properly vetted and selected worshipers can quickly learn how to be safe and effective defenders of their house of worship.

That’s why.

This is security theater in it’s most absurd version.

Source: Less than 24 hours after mass shooting at mosques, New Zealand vows to ban semi-automatic rifles

New Zealand Mosque Shootings – Defend Your Church From Violent Threat

New Zealand Police Say Multiple Deaths in 2 Mosque Shootings in Christchurch

CHURCH LEADERS AND SECURITY TEAMS

As a church leader, are you responsible for the safety of your congregation, volunteers, and staff? Churches are the last place we’d like to think of violence happening. But it’s a possibility we can no longer ignore. You don’t want to have to say, “We didn’t think it would happen here.” So, in the event of a violent threat, are you prepared to defend and protect?

DSI is at the forefront of creating solutions and training for places of worship anxious to move from defenseless to defended

Regardless of if you have 10 or 10,000 people to protect, we have a plan for you. 

While we understand that you have a unique budget, there are ways you can start to train your security team within that budget…at your own location.

You can determine how far you want your training to progress. Regardless of the level you choose to build toward, they will all provide better options than doing nothing.

STEP ONE
We recommend signing up for the Team Level Membership. You can put 6 team members into our online Team Defense Academy for $89/month. As your staff or volunteers change, it’s easy to swap team members in or out of the membership.

STEP TWO
Next, we’d suggest you find a competent, local instructor so your team can take some basic NRA-type courses if they are not already at that skill level. Those classes are generally inexpensive and will ensure basic firearms handling in a hands-on environment.

STEP THREE
Train the trainer. Consider sending a key team member to our Instructor course. This will allow that team member to come back and train other team members at no cost to you. If new people enter your security team, they can be trained by your own instructor.

The Team Level Membership – You and 5 others for $89 per month.

THE HUB FOR ALL DISTRIBUTED SECURITY, INC TRAINING RESOURCES is our online Defense Academy. Inside you will find content, instructional courses, lectures, training plans, and other resources designed to help you achieve your training objectives.

The TEAM membership for the Defense Academy is designed for church staff or security teams who face a common security challenge – in the event of a violent confrontation, how do you defend your congregation, volunteers, and staff until the arrival of law enforcement? Our Team membership is intended to provide the content, instruction, plans, and resources for small teams to learn how to defend life and property.

Our Team Level training expands the area of operation from an individual in their home or on the street, to a team working to secure your house of worship. We build our team plans around 6-member cadres and utilize our 12-month Advance training plan to train them to Advance level competencies. Training of the individuals to work as a team is only part of the process. Because they are working to secure a physical location, it is necessary to add to the plan, various analytical and organizational steps. The Team Plan details the following steps necessary to secure building and property including:

  • Conducting a security analysis.
  • Forming your security team.
  • Provisioning the team.
  • Operational planning.
  • Training the team.
  • Validating your training.
  • Mobilizing the team.

DSI has been at the forefront of creating programs and strategies that train individuals in organizations to defend their life and property. Our Team membership to the online defense academy is designed to provide the content, instruction, plans and resources for small teams to learn how to defend and protect lives. The cost for a Team membership to the online defense academy is $89 per month for a team of 6 individuals.

Teams get their own online Private Training Group (PTG). 

Consider the Private Training Group as your virtual ready room where you store your important information – photos, videos, files, announcements related to the organization, training and operation of your security team.

Team PTG Graphic

Each Team gets a customized interactive training plan and supervising instructor.

Anchored by participation in DSI’s on-range training courses, this plan defines pre-requisites for each progressively more challenging level of training, and specifies the readings, videos, and practice drills that must be addressed before course attendance at each level. The plan is not overly prescriptive – there remains considerable flexibility for the student to control his own pace and adapt the program to his individual schedule and circumstances, while still focusing on the end goal of proficiency in two weapon systems and in the tactics and cognitive knowledge that will allow the sober, lawful, and deliberate application of those skills as an individual, and as a member of a team or larger articulated unit in defense of home, business, church, school or community against evolving threats.

Team PLAN Graphic

In broad outline, this program ensures competency in the combative use of handgun and rifle; in the principles of individual tactics that will make you hard to kill and allow you to apply those skills successfully in a fight for your life; and in the cognitive infrastructure of intelligence, communications, planning, collective training, and organization that will provide you the enormous leverage of working with like-minded and similarly trained people to secure your business, school, church,or community in that critical gap between the sudden appearance of a violent threat and the decisive intervention of law enforcement – a gap that is steadily widening in much of America as the social contract frays and resources contract.

Click on the Team membership option to get started. The Team membership is $89 a month for six team members. Of course you can cancel at anytime.

The New York Times Editorial Board Thinks American Gun Culture Is Going On Trial

What concerns the alpha females at the New York Times is not that this rifle has been used to kill children. What concerns them is that millions have these rifles and the training necessary to defeat their agenda.

Learn how you can develop a distributed security network in your community: https://distributedsecurity.com/offerings/private-defense-networks.html

Source: Opinion | American Gun Culture Goes on Trial

Peter Kirsanow: ‘Astonishing’ Spike in School Violence via Obama’s DOE

Defend your school. The Department of Education won’t. Click to view our “Comprehensive School Security Strategy” https://ptdrv.linkedin.com/gj2nbt8

“It’s always been the case that black and Hispanic students had markedly higher suspension and expulsion rates than white and Asian students. The Obama administration attributed this to, apparently, intentional discrimination rather than acts that might merit suspensions and expulsions being committed by black and Hispanic students at a higher rate than did whites and Asians.”

Peter Kirsanow explained how Obama-era education policies led to racial and ethnic school disciplinary quotas.

Source: Peter Kirsanow: ‘Astonishing’ Spike in School Violence via Obama’s DOE

Tour Distributed Security’s On-Line Defense Academy

The on-line Defense Academy is home to our tactical firearms training curriculum consisting of thousands of pages written over tens of thousands of hours by a team of military vets, security contractors, federal agents, state police, special forces operators, and SWAT team members. We deliver our curriculum via on-line, on-range, and on-site courses, programs, and hundreds of supporting resources. Ron Danielowski, chief instructor and co-founder narrates a tour of our on-line resources used to support new students. Click here to subscribe: https://distributedsecurity.com/start-here/membership-options.html


Tactical Firearms Training Course – March 29-31 – Archbold, Ohio

Tactical firearms training course registration closing this Monday, March 11, for the March 29-31 Tier 3 Course at Archibold, Ohio

Click here to register: https://distributedsecurity.com/offerings/training-calendar.html

DETAILS

The Tier 3 – INDIVIDUAL TACTICS Program is designed for individuals who want to master armed self-defense in home and street scenarios. The on-range course reviews, refreshes and hones handgun skills taught in our modular Combative Handgun Program, and develops decision making and tactical skills with 12 escalating Reality Based Training (RBT) scenarios using non-lethal training firearms and live role players. Online training resources introduce a wide range of tactics, techniques, and concepts to streamline and accelerate the on-range training.

WHAT IS RBT? RBT is a type of simulation or “force-on-force” training that provides stress inoculation – allowing the student to experience what violence looks and feels like during a lethal force confrontation. Because of the immersive nature of the training, the brain and body can absorb and process the experience as if it were actually occurring to nearly the same degree as if it were an actual situation. RBT boosts the student’s confidence in his ability to dominate adversaries under the normally debilitating stress of a lethal force encounter. This type of experiential training builds the fund of applicable experience that will speed effective decision making and effective performance in a crisis.

STUDENTS LEARN how distance and reaction time force decision making in a lethal force confrontation. They learn how to test for compliance and de-escalate a situation by clear, forceful verbal commands. They learn how to quickly assess and react to a wide variety of threats, and apply their decision making, gun handling, and tactical skills in realistic scenarios, under conditions that include low light, multiple adversaries, stress, limited time, and uncertainty. They learn how to communicate effectively with 9-1-1 operators and responding law enforcement officers.

This course is suited for graduates of our Combative Handgun Program (or, with our review and approval, similar quality training obtained elsewhere), who want to hone and refresh their gun handling skills while applying them in the challenging RBT environment. We include basic tactics and techniques for two people working together, making this Program especially well-suited for couples who want to learn how to defend their home, working both individually and as a team.

Our training methodology is delivered in three phases: pre-course information and guidance, range training, and our post-course support system.

  1. Pre-course: When you register for this Program, you will receive detailed instructions and access to curricula, instructional videos and photos, drills, manuals, scenarios, and other resources in our online Defense Academy so that you can, on your own schedule, become comfortable with key concepts and techniques before you attend your on-range Tier 3 course. You will have access to qualified instructors who can answer your questions and address your concerns before you ever set foot on the range.
  2. Your completion of the pre-course work allows us to minimize “classroom” or lecture time during the range training event. While awaiting your turn to rotate through each RBT scenario, you will practice and polish your gun handling skills with our expert instructors on the live fire range. In RBT, you will apply those gun handling skills along with effective tactics and solid decision making to solve realistic, stressful, and increasingly difficult problems that pit you against well-trained and carefully scripted role players in a safe training environment.
  3. Post-course: You will gain access to additional resources in the Defense Academy to help you review and sustain the skills and knowledge you have developed in your Tier 3 course. Our training staff will remain accessible to answer any questions and recommend further training opportunities. 
    Program Information

COST: $1,695
DATESSee Calendar
TIME: 3 Days on-range
LOCATION: Archbold, Ohio
PREREQUISITE: Completion of DSI’s Combative Handgun Program. Comparable training obtained elsewhere may be an acceptable substitute, at the discretion of DSI’s Chief Instructor.

How do you create the defended enterprise?


In the event of a violent threat, how do you defend your enterprise?

How do you move from defenseless to defended?

DSI is at the forefront of creating solutions and packages for enterprises anxious to move from defenseless to defended. Whether you’re a Brooklyn bodega, a Detroit manufacturer, a Chicago professional services firm or a suburban mixed-use development we have the resources you need to become the defended enterprise.

Learn more here: www.distributedsecurity.com

Another Perspective on “Arming Teachers”

Jon Alexander has raised some serious challenges to the concept of “arming teachers” to strengthen security in our schools. Allow me to shift the debate somewhat by adjusting its fundamental assumptions.

Speculation isn’t necessary

In the U.S. today, at least fourteen states have laws on the books which allow school boards to authorize concealed carry of firearms by school staff, under various conditions, while ten more states do not restrict concealed carry to school staff members only, although most of them still require specific, individual permission of the governing school board. The number is growing every year: last year, Wyoming joined; this year bills are pending in Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Florida. Meantime, in Ohio alone, over 1,000 trained school staff members are carrying concealed handguns in more than one-quarter of the school districts in that state. In South Dakota, Texas, Colorado and other states, significant and growing numbers of school staff members are already legally carrying concealed firearms – while Utah has allowed anyone with a state concealed carry permit to carry a firearm on school property for going on 19 years.

So, this is not a new idea; quite the contrary. We have a considerable amount of experience with it, and because of the decentralized approach, wherein state laws and school board policies differ, we have quite a variety of experiments underway.

How is it working out? Famously. While mass shooters have not been particularly deterred by the presence of uniformed School Resource Officers (Columbine High School and Parkland, Florida being particular examples), there is no evidence of a single school shooting taking place in any district across the country where trained, non-law enforcement school staff members are carrying concealed weapons. Correlation is not causation, but that fact cannot be easily dismissed.

There are also zero examples of injuries resulting from the kind of mishaps commonly predicted by the skeptics: no accidental shootings, no rowdy students shot by frustrated teachers, no gun take-aways by students. They’re just not happening.

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11 School Shootings This Year? It’s Past Time to Arm Teachers!

Guns-In-School

By: Bill Tallen Executive Vice President – Tactical Operations – Distributed Security, Inc.

The BBC ran a story recently on school shootings and the debate over arming school staff to defend against same (http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-42804741). I was present as an observer (along with the BBC reporter) at the FASTER training in Colorado in June 2017, supported the passage of legislation a year ago in Wyoming that allows armed school staff at school board discretion, assisted in the formulation of non-regulatory guidance on the topic for the Wyoming Department of Education, now support implementation of this law in my own northwest Wyoming school district, and am an officer and founding partner in Distributed Security, Inc. (www.distributedsecurity.com), which offers training in this and related areas. So I think I’ll weigh in.

Let’s not quibble over statistics any more than necessary, as it is about as thankless and unrewarding as wrestling a pig. Regardless of when you start counting, or what you count, it’s inarguable that school shootings, while not commonplace given the sheer number of schools in America, are certainly frequent enough to capture the attention of the media – and of parents and communities who understand that our children are our most precious assets. School shootings are a classic example of a “low probability, high consequence” risk. Events of such monstrously unacceptable consequence deserve our attention and resources, even if as individuals we think the dice in our particular neighborhood are very unlikely to come up snake-eyes.

Resistance is futile – arming school staff is the trend

The legal context is this. Federal law – the Gun Free School Zones Act of 1995 – makes it illegal to possess a firearm on school property anywhere in America, unless an individual falls under one of several specific exclusions, the most self-evident being the ones for commissioned law enforcement or contracted security guards.  But there is also an exclusion for anyone “licensed by the state” to possess a firearm in the schools. That license has been interpreted by the courts to include a state concealed carry permit, but only if the state law regarding permits explicitly authorizes permittees to carry in schools. The States differ widely. A few, such as Utah, simply do not list schools as areas off-limits for concealed carry.  This qualifies as an “inconvenient truth” for those opposing firearms in schools, because there hasn’t been a shooting, accidental or otherwise, in a Utah school in the 18 years this law has been in effect. Half of the States allow permitted concealed carry in schools under varying conditions. At last count (and here is an important quibble, BBC), fifteen States allow concealed carry by permittees with the permission of the school board or administration; another ten allow carry by staff as well as non-staff concealed carry permittees under a variety of conditions, most of which involve some form of local approval. As the BBC reports, six more states are currently considering bills which allow the arming of school staff.

We often hear, “If the threat is that bad, we should have police officers in the schools.” But to use my district as an example, we have one commissioned School Resource Officer, and seven schools. To hire more would cost $43-45,000 a year in burdened salary for each, or over a quarter million a year to put just one in each of the six unprotected schools. The initial cost of processing and training school staff who volunteer to carry their own weapons concealed would be $2-3,000 each, plus perhaps 20% of that each year for annual refresher training. The first year’s salary of one uniformed officer would pay the initial cost of 14-20 concealed carry staff members; and in many states, non-profit fundraising organizations provide scholarships to pay for armed school staff’s training. The cost advantages are obvious.

This background allows us to reply to the BBC’s title question, “Is it time to arm teachers?” by pointing out that between one-third and one-half of the States in this union have already decided that yes, it is, and authorized their school boards to proceed.

Teachers who do not trust. . . teachers

The next part of the BBC’s reportage that I’ll comment on is the uncritical presentation of certain opposition viewpoints. We are told that an NEA survey in 2013 reported 68% of teachers opposed to having armed non-law enforcement people in school. What is not pointed out is: (1) the NEA as an organization is opposed and campaigns against arming school staff; (2) the NEA is a teachers’ union with a well-documented leftwing slant on most social issues; (3) their survey was only sent to 800 of their own members, so what we do know is that 544 union members agree with their union on the topic. Pardon me if I am unimpressed. A survey undertaken in Powell, Wyoming this month gave results very nearly opposite the NEA’s – 64% of staff, not to mention 75% of parents, felt that armed staff would make schools safer – and I suspect that is closer to the sentiment of much of America, educators and non-educators alike. If it isn’t so everywhere, well, that’s the beauty of living in a republic – you can, within personal constraints, choose your community.

Legislators who don’t trust teachers

Our BBC friends also share the sentiments of a Michigan “former teacher-turned-Democratic state senator” who is among a “vocal minority that opposes” the bill that passed his house by a large margin last year, and who disparages anyone who would volunteer to carry in the schools as a “Rambo”. On the one hand, I might point out that his viewpoint lost, or that his views don’t seem to be informed by experience as an armed citizen or trainer. On the other hand, I could (and have) spoken against a legislative approach like Michigan’s that forces an expansion of concealed carry into a wide variety of locations – like schools – where it was formerly prohibited. Especially the schools. It is a contentious topic, and I believe it is best handled the way the afore-mentioned 15 states have done so – leave it to the discretion of individual school boards; and of course, the people armed will all be volunteers – no one would be forced to carry a firearm. Experience in Ohio, South Dakota, and elsewhere has shown that while boards are initially hesitant to use their discretion, once a few do so, the trickle quickly becomes a flood as it is demonstrated that the thing can be done safely, for a very substantial increase in security. I suspect this may also have something to do with the real liability question involved – not “what if there’s an accidental shooting?” but “what if there’s an active shooter, and our kids die because I and my fellow trustees voted down armed security?”

Training is the key

Everywhere this battle is joined, one of the more common refrains of the opposition to armed school staff is that “teachers” can’t be trained in X hours, with X being whatever training they’re taking or required to take.  First of all, “teachers” is a misleading, as usually all school staff, not just teachers, are eligible, and arguably administrators, counsellors, coaches, custodians, etc. can be better candidates as they are less likely to be tied down, responsible for a classroom full of kids, instead of free to respond toward the “sound of the gun”.

Second, many of the critics have never participated in any combative handgun training whatsoever and have no idea what they are talking about.

Third, modern training techniques allow a 24-hour course, mixing live fire training with scenario-based training using nonlethal firearms and live role players, as offered by DSI, FASTER, and other purveyors of training (and required by law in several states, and by liability insurance providers in others) to impart the necessary skills and mindset. I’ve heard these assertions of “not enough training” both from anti-gun progressives, and from retired law enforcement officers. The latter (all credit to them for their service) sometimes have not witnessed modern training techniques and default back to their dreary academy courses decades ago, where they spent 40, 60, or 80 hours in what amounted to painful, redundant, and unproductive training. I speak as a retired Federal Agent and former director of an agency academy myself; there are better ways, guys, come and see.

Finally – on the training issue – I find it interesting to hear it asserted that educators cannot possibly be trained to react appropriately in an active shooter situation. I’ve been training civilians (as well as police and military) for decades, and haven’t found any career field that disqualifies a dedicated person from learning the firearms, tactics, and decision-making skills required. In fact, educators by their very nature and background, are among the best adult learners out there. Millions of Americans, from all walks of life, carry concealed firearms daily without mishap or misjudgment, and when forced to react to a shooting, usually do so with skill and discretion – even those who have not completed intense 24-hour training programs. If you asked me, as a trainer, whether Michigan’s proposed eight hours of training is enough, I’d say probably not – and I hope that requirement will get beefed up before the bill reaches the Governor’s desk. But to all the “not enough training” sharpshooters, my last response would be, “Why do you think it’s better to have no defender at all, leaving kids helpless against a mass murderer, than to give them a chance of survival with someone who is willing to rise to the challenge and protect them, even if they have not attained some arbitrary threshold of training?”

 

Bill Tallen is Executive Vice President – Tactical Operations. Prior to joining the enterprise he had a 20 year career with the Department of Energy, where he served as a Federal Agent, team leader, unit commander, training instructor, and manager in the agency which provides secure transportation of nuclear weapons and nuclear materials within CONUS. He helped to found DOE’s Special Response Force program, developing and teaching urban and close quarter battle techniques to Federal Agents charged with recovery of lost assets. He has designed and conducted a variety of wargaming efforts in support of vulnerability assessments, security system design, and leadership training, and has taught a variety of crisis decision making models. Bill holds the degree of Master of Arts in National Security and Strategic Studies from the U.S. Naval War College. 

Can the Free Market Provide National Defense?

Tom Woods hosts a debate (Ep. 1062 of the Tom Woods Show) between economist Bob Murphy (Ph.D., NYU – arguing for) and podcaster Todd Lewis (arguing against) who square off in the central debate of anarcho-capitalism: is government truly necessary for national defense, or could the free market (through Private Defense Agencies or “PDAs) provide this service?

Great points are made on both sides, however, we believe what is being argued here is only half the picture.

Much like personal defense, when one abdicates personal responsibility/security to a third party causes you to abdicate control, placing yourself behind in the decision-making process, limiting potential solutions to problems, increasing cost, and introducing moral hazards.

While PDAs are a necessary part of dealing with decentralized/asymmetric warfare (4th Generation Warfare), they are only a part of the answer.

What’s the other half of the picture and a better answer?

Distributed security.

Where individuals and communities can come together and provide security solutions as needed, and disband when it’s not.

Think of the Swiss system on steroids with a greater free market twist (like PDAs) and you will see the underpinnings of the solution.

How To Beat Terrorism by L. Neil Smith

Away, way back in 1977, when I began writing my first novel, _The Probability Broach_ (still in print, after four decades), I was regarded as something of a nutcase because I argued that American society would be a much better, safer place if everybody who wanted to, carried a gun. I was by no means the first to do so, nor was I the only one at the time, but, except for Robert A. Heinlein, Elmer Keith, and the ghost of H. Beam Piper, I often felt very much alone in my simple, straightforward, common-sense advocacy of exercising one’s natural rights under the Second Amendment to the Constitution. Now, of course, forty years later, armed self-defense has become a social movement. The degree to which I share responsibility for that is debatable, but I am proud of any part I may have had in it.

Last weekend (no, I am not changing the subject) was a pretty lousy one for peace and civil order in the United Kingdom of Great Britain. Egged on by various evil shamans (one of them in the States), Islamic terrorists employed an automobile and big knives to wound and murder dozens of innocent individuals who were trying to enjoy a warm summer evening—in a near-Arctic climate that doesn’t offer many of them—and whose only “crime” was that they did not choose to follow the benighted religious precepts of a 7th century Arab merchant-trader.

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Georgia Fugitives Captured by Home Owners

Yes, we can.

The bravery of a homeowner put an end to the three-day long manhunt, Fitzhugh said.
The inmates had run through the woods to a home on Pruitt Road, near the rural community of Christiana.

“The homeowner was alerted somehow, he looked outside and saw the suspects trying to steal his vehicle,” Lt. Bill Miller from the Tennessee Highway Patrol said late Friday.

The homeowner called his neighbor and both men, each armed with a gun, confronted the fugitives…

Ricky Dubose and Donnie Rowe after their capture.

Ricky Dubose and Donnie Rowe after their capture.
Source: CNN

Does National Defense Require the State?

Gordon Tullock used to taunt anarchists by asserting that if the USA abolished its government, people would not have to worry about the Russians taking over the country because “the Mexicans would get here first.”

This little story actually incorporates a common objection to anarchy—namely, the idea that because, if a country abolished its government, other countries would not necessarily follow suit, the governments of those other countries would be free to, and would, simply take over the country that, lacking a government, also lacked an effective means of defending itself against takeover by a foreign power.

This thinking presumes at least two critical ideas: first, that defense of a population requires a government that rules that population; and, second, that if a government has the power to take over another country, it will do so.

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