Category Archives: 050 Anarcho-Capitalism

Penn Jillette Can’t Have His Gay Wedding Cake and Eat It Too

“Popular entertainer and self-described libertarian Penn Jillette disappointed many liberty advocates in this recent CNN Tonight segment. The discussion was nominally about homosexuality and Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act, but the real issue at stake was and will continue to be freedom of association.

The controversy stems from cases where business owners have refused for religious reasons to sell engaged gay couples wedding cakes and flowers. For example the owner of a bakery in Colorado was sued by a gay couple for refusing to bake a wedding cake for them. The court ordered him to bake wedding cakes for same-sex couples, give his staff anti-discrimination law training, and submit quarterly reports to the state’s Civil Rights Commission confirming that he is complying with the government’s orders.

Jillette unfortunately fell into the trap of making this issue about religion and homosexuality: ‘You’re not talking about forcing people to engage in gay sex, or even endorse gay sex. We’re asking them that maybe they can treat people the same as other people, and that does not seem unreasonable. It’s okay, I suppose — although goofy – to be against gays, but it’s not okay to be against people who simply want to use your services.’ “

(Via.) Liberty.me <—Click here to read more

For Privacy or Transparency, Bitcoin Benefits Liberty

“Proponents of Bitcoin, myself included, tend to focus on the potential for privacy it offers against increasing government intrusion into our financial affairs. But Bitcoin is not only a tool for those who wish to remain hidden—scofflaws, paranoid conspiracy nuts, crypto-anarchists, and of course the ever-present three-headed bogeyman of terrorists, drug dealers, and child abusers. It is also a tool for those who value transparency. Does that sound like a paradox? Well, it isn’t. A major characteristic of a technology that increases freedom is that it can be used for a widely varying range of choices.

I’ll talk a bit more about how that works in the case of Bitcoin later on, but first I’d like to submit as evidence for the transparency benefits of Bitcoin the recent discovery of extensive corruption on the part of two government agents involved in the Silk Road seizure. The agents—DEA agent Carl Mark Force IV and Shaun W. Bridges of the Secret Service—are allegedly jointly responsible for, amongst other crimes, the misappropriation and laundering of over a million dollars worth of bitcoin (estimated at the price at which they would have sold at the time they were obtained) confiscated from the Silk Road website. Carl Force was also a major investor in, and employee of, Bitcoin exchange CoinMTK while involved in the case, and is accused of having stolen customer funds while there.”

(Via.) Bitcoin Benefits Liberty <— Read the rest of the story here

Push for Concealed Carry on Campuses is Gaining Ground

“At least 11 states are considering whether to allow concealed weapons on college campuses this year, the latest chapter in a now seemingly annual legislative debate between gun control advocates and gun rights supporters.

Bills have been introduced, at least once, in almost half of the 50 states in the past few years. Despite slow success thus far — just seven states have adopted versions of campus carry laws — gun rights advocates have their eyes on two very large prizes this year: Florida and Texas.

Right now, the odds are starting to stack up in their favor. The Texas bill has passed the Senate and is on its way to House. The version in Florida has passed through two Senate committees and is headed to the Judiciary Committee.”

(Via.) Inside Higher Ed

iSpy: The CIA Campaign to Steal Apple’s Secrets

“The revelations that the CIA has waged a secret campaign to defeat the security mechanisms built into Apple’s devices come as Apple and other tech giants are loudly resisting pressure from senior U.S. and U.K. government officials to weaken the security of their products. Law enforcement agencies want the companies to maintain the government’s ability to bypass security tools built into wireless devices. Perhaps more than any other corporate leader, Apple’s CEO, Tim Cook, has taken a stand for privacy as a core value, while sharply criticizing the actions of U.S. law enforcement and intelligence agencies.”

(Via.) Firstollok.org: The Intersept

Texas Town Experiences 61% Drop in Crime After Firing Their Police Department | The Free Thought Project

Another aspect, and possibly the most important, that sets privatized police apart from agents of the state, is that they have a negative incentive to initiate force. Force and violence are vastly more expensive than today’s police lead us to believe.

Causing injury or death, or wrongfully depriving someone of their rights is very expensive if these costs are realized for the ones who cause them. The state does not care, however. They can and will defer their liability to the tax farm.

The act of deferment of liability is a function solely reserved for the state, and it creates an incentive to act in an unethical manner. In the case of SEAL Security, each of their officers, as well as their entire operation, can be held liable, both criminally and financially. This is something about which the state knows nothing.

As guns.com points out, over 70 communities in Harris County and most of the major management districts have contracted with SEAL. They’re less expensive, better at crime prevention, they do not target citizens for revenue, and, best of all, each officer is personally accountable for his or her actions.

It’s time Americans start seriously considering this option.

Law enforcement is a product that we are forced to buy. When any product is not subject to the forces of consumer demand, there is no way of changing it. It is time we applied the fundamental lesson of competition to our supposed protectors.

via The Free Thought Project

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