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Individual Movement Techniques (Part 1)

Keeping in mind the tactical principles we spoke of above, we are now going to incorporate individual movement techniques.

What are individual movement techniques?

Individual movement techniques (IMT’s) are the most basic footwork techniques that are employed at the individual, team, and higher level. If practiced appropriately, these basic tactics and techniques should serve you well when you do have a second shooter (such as a significant other or a friend) to back you up.

Basic footwork concepts

The purpose of footwork is to get you from where you are to where you want to be safely and as quickly as you deem necessary.As you can well imagine, in most gunfights you will need to maneuver in order to put yourself in situations that you can begin to shape circumstances.As you can well imagine, in most gunfights you will need to maneuver in order to put yourself in situations that you can begin to shape circumstances.

We use the term maneuver in the military sense, in that maneuver is not simply moving about, it is moving about under fire/observation/in contact – with a purpose. For the purposes of this

While maneuver is important, we must temper our desire to overwhelm the adversary’s decision making process with a distinction between speed and haste.Haste is committing to action without taking advantage of prior coordination or thought as to support for your action when such support is available. Hastily presenting yourself to a prepared adversary will hardly overwhelm his

Haste is committing to action without taking advantage of prior coordination or thought to support for your action when such support is available. Hastily presenting yourself to a prepared adversary will hardly overwhelm his decision making process.

However; coordinating your effort to present the adversaries with multiple actions at the same time will most likely overwhelm the adversary’s decision making process.

Ideally, you would pick the movement technique that is best suited to your situation, whether that be the heel to toe method or the foot drag, or some other method will be totally dependent on your situation. Also keep in mind that in a real life fight for life, your body will do what it needs to in order to survive.

While these movement techniques are important to practice, and they may work well many times, we need to be focused on our environment and what is needed now in your current situation.

I am not attempting to be noncommittal here, what I am trying to be is practical.

Don’t marry yourself to a technique or get wrapped around the axle in regards to movement techniques; because what you do under the stress of fight for life will not look picture perfect.

Remember what matters most, getting to where you want to go safely and as quickly as you feel you need to.

Often the movement technique that is needed is something that is not orthodox, a combination of what the body does naturally and what the mind prompts the body to do under stress. We see this all the time on the range and in our RBT scenarios, people naturally start moving more tactically under the stress of a violent and chaotic encounter, it’s the body’s natural response to wanting to protect itself, and it very rarely looks picture perfect or pretty.

Does this negate the need to teach proper movement techniques? No, because when the situation is right and presents itself, you should at the very least have the tools in your tactical tool bag which will give you the option of how you can approach or egress an area or an adversary dependent upon your needs at the time.

In the next post, we will take a look our first movement technique called the “heel to toe” method.

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